As a member of the Huntington Study Group (HSG), Hereditary Neurological Disease Centre works in partnership with universities, hospitals, doctors, and scientists around the world who work around the clock looking for new treatments.

Numerous mouse models have been generated that constitute invaluable tools to examine the pathogenesis of the disease and to develop and evaluate novel therapies. 

Among those models, knock-in mice provide a genetically precise reproduction of the human condition. The slow progression and early development of behavioral, pathological, cellular, and molecular abnormalities in knock-in mice make these animals valuable to understand the early pathological events triggered by mutation.

A key component of our research program is the importance of post-mortem tissue donation, a final gift that could hold the key to unlock the mystery that is Huntington Disease. 

On the left, a brain tissue sample from a healthy, 34-year old. On the right, a sample from a 45-year old with HD. Images provided by Jean Paul Vonsattel, MD

On the left, a brain tissue sample from a healthy, 34-year old. On the right, a sample from a 45-year old with HD.
Images provided by Jean Paul Vonsattel, MD

Considered a rare disorder, one in 8,000 people are believed to have Huntington Disease. There are an estimated 30,000 diagnosed cases in the United States with another 300,000 at risk for the disease. 

Currently, observational studies and clinical trials are available for eligible individuals. If interested, please talk with a member of the HNDC team to learn more about how your participation may enhance future research and discovery.